QCEA: Child Immigration Detention in Europe

This report explores aspects of child immigration detention in Europe. After briey describing the legal framework and standards at international and European levels, the report gives an overview of the situation in Europe by addressing three main questions: How many children are detained in the context of migration?
Which laws and policies regulate the practice, and what are the existing alternatives to child immigration detention
The report also discusses the impacts of detention, giving special attention to the different impacts on girls and boys in detention.
The report concludes by reasserting that detention is never in the best interests of a child, having detrimental impact on health and well-being. While there is an international growing consensus on the need for alternatives to detaining children,
European countries are continuing to do so.

Children in Detention: Report on the Cedars

March 2017: C E D A R S Pre-Departure Accommodation Independent Monitoring Board 2016 Annual Report

2.3 Population Profile during 2016

The number of families accommodated at Cedars during 2016 was lower than in 2015, although this was for nine and a half months only. 14 families were accommodated during the reporting period.

The families represented nine different nationalities of which the top three were Albanian, Chinese and Nigerian. The top two religions were Islam and Christianity. Of the 14 families, two were removed from the UK, 12 were released into the community, of which five were released due to disruption or non-compliance. Three of these were released from Cedars and two at the departure point. Assessment, Care in Residence and Teamwork (ACRT) procedures were initiated six times, and there were no recorded incidents of actual self-harm. Continue reading

Home Office block on Afghan and Eritrean teen refugees ‘a disgrace’

guardian_logo

‘Dubs eligibility rules’ restricting child migrant entry to UK by age and nationality slammed by shadow home affairs minister.

The Home Office has come under attack over the publication of new, highly restrictive, eligibility criteria for child refugees hoping to be transferred from France to Britain, which will stop many Eritrean, Afghan and Yemeni teenagers aged 13 or 14 getting sanctuary in the UK. Continue reading

Association of Directors of Children’s Services: Support for unaccompanied children

adcs-on-uascsFAQ General

Q. What is the definition of an unaccompanied asylum seeking child?

The definition of an unaccompanied asylum seeking child (UASC) is set out in the Immigration Rules. It states that a UASC is someone who:

  • is under 18 years of age when the claim is submitted;
  • is claiming in their own right; and
  • is separated from both parents and is not being cared for by an adult who in law or by custom has responsibility to do so.

Continue reading

First of the huge court fee increases come into force

RtRIt may not surprise you to learn that, following a public consultation over the proposed hike in immigration and asylum court fees during which lawyers, NGOs and the public warned the government the fees would severely impede access to justice and threaten the rule of law, the goverment is introducing said increase as of today, Monday 10 October 2016.

As Jo Wilding has pointed out in her article in The Conversation, this is a:

“huge increase in procedural costs after the government announced fee hikes of over 500% for some types of appeal through the immigration and asylum tribunals.” Continue reading

Bring Children to Safety from Camps

help-refugeesCampaigning to Protect Refugee Children

Time for action – the UK Government must deliver on its refugee children commitment now
“Once in a while, there are major challenges that test our humanitarianism, and Europe’s refugee crisis is surely one such challenge.”
Lord Dubs
Ask your local Councillor to pressure Government into action today.

In May 2016 the Government made a commitment to work with local councils to bring unaccompanied refugee children in Europe to safety in the UK, under an agreement called the “Dubs scheme”.

Three months on and they have completely failed to deliver on this promise. Continue reading

Liberty: Child Refugees

libertyIn May our MPs made a promise. Under huge public pressure, and the watchful eye of the House of Lords, the Government pledged in Parliament to protect unaccompanied refugee children in Europe.

That was 105 days ago and counting.
Since then almost no action has been taken to make good on this pledge. Lord Dubs himself – who was instrumental in securing it – has condemned the astonishing lack of urgency from central Government. Continue reading

Unlocking Detention 2016: be part of shining a spotlight in the shadows

RtREvery year for the past three years, Right to Remain has helped to run an innovative and participatory social media project that raises awareness of immigration detention in the UK – it’s called Unlocking Detention (http://unlocked.org.uk/) (or “Unlocked” for short).

Unlocking Detention is a ‘virtual tour’ of the UK’s immigration detention estate – and of the impact of detention on communities across the UK.  Each week, we ‘visit’ another of the UK’s detention centres and we hear from people who have been detained there (and who still are), volunteer visitors to that centre, NGOs and campaigners who are involved with challenging immigration detention, and the families, friends, neighbours and communities over whom detention casts its long shadows.  The tour runs from 10 October to 18 December 2016. Continue reading