England’s forgotten refugees: Out of the fire and into the frying pan

May 25, 2016 by  
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2016 May Refugee Council reportRefugee Council:  Josephine Basedow and Lisa Doyle May 2016

Recommendations

• The Government should introduce an integration support service for newly recognised refugees, flexible enough to ensure those facing specific barriers can be supported to access all services to which they are entitled. Whilst all refugees will not need the same level of assistance as resettled refugees who have just entered the country, many of the same issues and barriers will need to be overcome with assistance from experienced professionals. Read more

Equal before the law?

May 25, 2016 by  
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 RtRThe UK government has proposed increasing the fees that need to be paid to appeal an asylum or immigration decision in the First-tier and Upper Tribunal in England and Wales:

http://www.righttoremain.org.uk/blog/equal-before-the-law-government-proposes-huge-court-fees-increase/

“We therefore propose increasing fees in the First-tier Tribunal from £80 to £490 for an application for a decision on the papers and from £140 to £800 for an application for an oral hearing. We also propose introducing a new fee of £455 for an application to the First-tier Tribunal for permission to appeal to the Upper Tribunal…

The consultation proposes a fee of £350 for an application to the Upper Tribunal for permission to appeal, where permission has been refused by the First-tier Tribunal, and a fee of £510 for an appeal hearing where permission is granted.”

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Petition: fees for applying for leave to remain

May 23, 2016 by  
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Sign PetitionPetition: The Government should not proceed with plans to increase immigration court fees.

The Government has proposed a massive increase in the fees that immigrants and asylum seekers pay to have their immigration/asylum cases heard in court. This huge rise in fee (eg. from £140 to £800 for a hearing in court) will prevent individuals from being able to take their cases to court.

More details

If the Home Office makes an incorrect decision on someone’s case, this can usually be appealed in court. The fee increase will make people unable to challenge such decisions, leading to severe disruption in their personal/family lives.

Only rich people will be able to access courts, as the proposed amounts are impossible for most immigrants and asylum seekers to pay. This is unacceptable.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/apr/21/asylum-and-immigration-court-fees-set-to-rise-by-over-500

Sign this petition

Please sign and share. 10,000 signatures means that the government will respond; 100,000 is what is needed for a debate! So still some way to go…. (If you also have contacts to community justice groups, this is also part of a drive to turn justice into a commodity which is only accessible by the rich – it’s not only about asylum seekers.)

 

Support for ‘failed asylum seekers’ under the new Immigration Act

May 23, 2016 by  
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parliament_logoHere are parts of Schedule 11:
Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 (provision of accommodation for failed asylum-seekers, etc ) is repealed.
Then: After section 95 insert—

95ASupport for failed asylum-seekers, etc who are unable to leave UK

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The Immigration Bill “ping-pong” ends with a glimmer of hope for detention – our statement

May 13, 2016 by  
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2016 Detention Forum12 May 2016: The Immigration Act, scheduled to receive Royal Assent in the coming days, will introduce automatic judicial oversight on the UK’s use of immigration detention for the first time and a 72-hour time limit on the detention of pregnant women.  

During the passage of the Immigration Bill which began in October last year, the Government listened to growing disquiet over immigration detention, raised by Parliamentarians and the general public.

Two detention-related amendments (judicial oversight and the detention of pregnant women) became the focus of the ping-pong in the very final stage of the Bill, which concluded on 10th May 2016 at the House of Lords.  In the end, the Government’s amendments were passed.  You can read the transcript hereRead more

Immigration Bill final stages

May 12, 2016 by  
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parliament_logoImportant changes will be included in the otherwise very negative Immigration Bill which is about to receive ‘royal assent’ and become an Act:

1) automatic bail hearings for those who have been in detention for four months.
2) 72 hour time limit on detention of pregnant women.
The ‘Storify’ link below is well worth looking at.

The last stages of the Immigration Bill 9th & 10th May 2016

Here’s how an automatic bail hearings (after 4 months of detention) and a 72-hour detention time limit for pregnant women came into existence

Project Daedalas

May 8, 2016 by  
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Project DaedalusPlease have a look at the group’s website and engage with them as appropriate to you: The closure of borders along “The Balkan Road” caused major change of situation. Greece was coerced into a role of a giant “filtration camp” for people1 coming (mostly) via Turkey, hoping to reach stability and safety within European Union. Instead, they are being “processed”, dis-empowered, detained and stripped off their dignity. And this is the only job the European Union is effective at. Read more

All eyes on detention again – the Immigration Bill returns to the Commons on 9th May

May 7, 2016 by  
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2016 Detention ForumUPDATE 6 May 2016: A big thank you to everyone who has been lobbying MPs to support the Lord Ramsbotham amendment – we are now seeing its impact.  The Government is feeling the pressure of the enormous disquiet from MPs, the House of Lords and the campaigners and has now published a ‘compromise’ amendment to the controversial judicial oversight clause that can leaves people in administrative incarceration for six months with not judicial oversight at all.

The new amendment, published late last night, reduces the length of time before automatic bail hearings of people in detention take place from six months of detention to four months of detention.

However, this ‘compromise’ amendment does nothing to address the serious misgivings highlighted in our briefing paper, in particular, the key thrust of both the Parliamentary Inquiry into the Use of Immigration Detention and the Shaw Review that the UK detains far too many people far too long and that the UK must immediately stop the practice of using detention as a norm rather than as an exception.

So please continue to lobby your MPs not to accept this ‘compromise’ amendment and instead to support the Ramsbotham amendment, as explained below.  This is not the same as a time limit on detention we would like to see as a first step in meaningful detention reform project, but we need to get all we can get from this Immigration Bill.  Thank you.   Read more

Government defeated on Lords amendments

April 28, 2016 by  
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Still human still hereLords Dubs’ compromise amendment was passed by 279 votes to 172. It will ensure the relocation of  “a specified number of unaccompanied refugee children from other countries in Europe” to be determined by the Government in consultation with local authorities.
Lord Ramsbotham’s amendment on time limits on detention was passed by 271 votes to 206 and a further amendment regarding the detention of pregnant women tabled by Baroness Lister was also passed by 259 votes to 203. Read more

The Business of Migration

April 26, 2016 by  
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G4SSYMAAG: For corporations like G4S, Serco, Capita and Mitie the suffering of refugees is part of their “asylum markets”. The biggest ever single Home Office contract – the disastrous COMPASS asylum housing contract –  is up for renewal next year. On the eve of an inquiry into its many failings, John Grayson looks at how global business is licking its lips at the money-making opportunities in housing, monitoring, detaining and deporting people escaping persecution.

Read morehttp://www.symaag.org.uk/2016/04/25/the-business-of-migration/

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