Costing Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children July 2017

5. Conclusions:

5.1 This research clearly demonstrates a significant gap in UASC funding. The results of the financial analysis above give an average cost to local authorities supporting UASC in their care as £55,194 per UASC per annum. By comparison with the weighted average Home Office reimbursement per UASC per annum of £30,231, a current funding shortfall to East Midlands local authorities of £24,963 per UASC per annum can be identified. In other words, present Home Office funding levels cover just over half (54.8%) of the costs incurred by local authorities in support of the current UASC cohort. Continue reading

Red Cross report: Can’t Stay Can’t Go

Conclusions:Life for refused asylum seekers who cannot be returned is bleak. They may be homeless or sofa-surfing, hungry or lacking adequate clothing. They may be struggling to access some form of healthcare. They are often experiencing all of these things. They currently have no, or an extremely limited, chance of regularisation of their status. Asylum support options are not accessible to them and this issue is likely to worsen under Section 95A. Without support, these people are vulnerable to exploitation and they are likely to drop off the radar, making it even less likely that they can be returned. Continue reading

Refugee Action report: Slipping through the Cracks

A report based on research from Refugee Action’s work with people seeking asylum in the UK highlighting the delays people face in the asylum support system while claiming asylum. Delays in correctly assessing people’s need for support, overturning decisions on appeal and in getting support to people have devastating consequences for people’s lives. This report outlines the changes we believe need to happen to make the asylum system fair. Continue reading

Committee for the Prevention of Torture report: UK detention practice

The Council of Europe’s Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) published a report (pdf) on UK detention practice in April 2017.

The report reviewed the treatment of people in adult and youth prisons, police custody, and immigration detention; with a specific focus on in-patient adult psychiatry. Continue reading

Gatwick Detention Welfare Group are running Refugee Tales 2017

Refugee Tales project is walking from Runnymede to Westminster between 1st – 5th July.  Walkers journey in solidarity with refugees, staying in churches and community buildings and sharing their stories, food and friendship along the way. Each evening there is a free public event, which uses Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as a model, with prestigious authors telling the stories of asylum seekers and those who work with them, combined with great music and compared by a well-known host.  

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Refugees Welcome? Executive Summary April 2017

“In the network we have people who are engineers, community leaders, teachers, people with important skills who can contribute to this country. When we’re talking about refugees that achieve great things for this country – like Mo Farah – not everybody is Mo Farah, but everybody has something to give to this country.”

Kolbassia, Survivors Speak Out network1 Continue reading

‘It’s a shambles’: data shows most asylum seekers put in poorest parts of Britain

More than five times as many destitute asylum seekers live in the poorest third of the country as in the richest third, according to a Guardian analysis, which has prompted leading politicians to call for a complete overhaul of the dispersal system.MPs have labelled the way asylum seekers are distributed around Britain “appalling”, “dreadfully designed” and “a deeply unfair shambles” because of the way it disproportionately houses people in poor, Labour-voting areas in the north of England and Wales, as well as Glasgow.

November 2016 HMIP inspection report of Morton Hall

The latest HMIP inspection report of Morton Hall detention centre is published today.
Morton Hall is particularly isolated and is often portrayed as “dangerous”, because people simply know so little about Morton Hall.  It is one centre that probably receives the least amount of coverage in general.  So please help raise awareness of what’s happening there by sharing some of the material here.

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Home Office Introduction of ‘Safe Country Review’ for Refugee Settlement

The Home Office has announced a new policy ending automatic settlement for refugees after 5 years. The policy states that ‘all those who apply for settlement protection after completing the appropriate probationary period of limited leave will be subjected to a safe return review’. The idea of ‘safe return reviews’ was introduced by Theresa May while she was Home Secretary in her 2015 Conservative Party Conference speech with the stated intention behind it to ensure that ‘only those who continue to need protection benefit from settlement on this route’. Concerns cited around the policy include the impact on the integration opportunities of refugees, particularly in terms of challenges in accessing work and education given automatic settlement is no longer guaranteed, as well as the bureaucratic burden on the Home Office to actively review individual cases. A response from Refugee Council is here.

Thanks, to Asylum Matters