Immigration policy: basis for building consensus

Second Report of Session 2017–19: Report, together with formal minutes relating to the  report. Ordered by the House of Commons to be printed 10 January 2018

Summary
Immigration is a crucial policy area for the UK Government. It has implications for the economy, public services and community cohesion, and has always been part of
our history as generations of immigration have brought benefits to our economy and
culture. Continue reading “Immigration policy: basis for building consensus”

G4S and other housing providers in the headlines again

The Home Office says that asylum seekers deserve ‘safe, habitable’ homes. What too many of them get is filth and squalor.

The cramped upstairs box room was meant to be used by one of Duminda’s children, but it is not in a fit state. An old mattress is propped up against the wall, and behind it is an expanse of black-green mould. In the downstairs bathroom, there is similarly widespread damp, and a smell that suggests the problem is serious. “We worry about the kids’ health,” Duminda tells me. …

Asylum offices ‘in a constant state of crisis’, say whistleblowers

25.12.2017: Guardian: Two whistleblowers claim Home Office departments delay asylum applications for profit

Staff in the Home Office’s asylum directorate are undertrained, overworked and operating in a “constant state of crisis”, two whistleblowers have claimed, as applicants endure long waits to have their case dealt with due to internal pressures. Continue reading “Asylum offices ‘in a constant state of crisis’, say whistleblowers”

 ‘Injustice in Immigration Detention’, an independent report by Dr Anna Lindley

Injustice in Immigration Detention – Bar Council: New research reveals that immigration detention ‘operates in a very unjust way’, has a ‘flawed statutory framework’ & ‘inadequate routes to challenge decisions.’ Our international reputation is at risk’, warns Bar Council.

Migrants held in detention for too long with inadequate access to the courts or to legal help are among a catalogue of problems highlighted by Injustice in Immigration Detention’, an independent report by Dr Anna Lindley of SOAS, published today.

also, please note, from Detention Forum:  A Conservative MP supports a call for time limit, suggesting 28 days

Andrew Mitchell MP has now written for ConservativesHome calling for a time limit.  Some of us will be meeting his office early in the new year to follow this up.  Please share it widely with the hashtag of #Time4aTimeLimit

Quakers: Sanctuary Everywhere Manifesto – challenging the ‘hostile environment’

Drawing of a woman, man, child and baby.Challenging immigration policies 5.12.2017

Britain’s Quakers are pledging to challenge immigration policies. The position takes a stand against the scandal of indefinite immigration detention, pledges support for ‘new, peaceful, safer routes of migration’, and opposes the possibility of unjust deportations and forced removals.

Continue reading “Quakers: Sanctuary Everywhere Manifesto – challenging the ‘hostile environment’”

UK migration: Government urged to drastically reduce excessive use of detention

Quarterly migration report shows that 27,817 people were detained in the last year

“The sheer numbers illustrate how the detention process has become normalised, when it ought to be an exceptional measure.” – Steve Valdez-Symonds Continue reading “UK migration: Government urged to drastically reduce excessive use of detention”

Sept 2017: Panorama programme re Brook House- letter to the press

A general briefing  from the Detention Forum regarding the very shocking Panorama programme on 4.9.2017 which revealed a high level of abuse at Brook House Immigration Removal Centre at Gatwick Airport., and you may also find this helpful   http://detentionforum.org.uk/1163-2/: Continue reading “Sept 2017: Panorama programme re Brook House- letter to the press”

Costing Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children July 2017

5. Conclusions:

5.1 This research clearly demonstrates a significant gap in UASC funding. The results of the financial analysis above give an average cost to local authorities supporting UASC in their care as £55,194 per UASC per annum. By comparison with the weighted average Home Office reimbursement per UASC per annum of £30,231, a current funding shortfall to East Midlands local authorities of £24,963 per UASC per annum can be identified. In other words, present Home Office funding levels cover just over half (54.8%) of the costs incurred by local authorities in support of the current UASC cohort. Continue reading “Costing Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children July 2017”

Red Cross report: Can’t Stay Can’t Go

Conclusions:Life for refused asylum seekers who cannot be returned is bleak. They may be homeless or sofa-surfing, hungry or lacking adequate clothing. They may be struggling to access some form of healthcare. They are often experiencing all of these things. They currently have no, or an extremely limited, chance of regularisation of their status. Asylum support options are not accessible to them and this issue is likely to worsen under Section 95A. Without support, these people are vulnerable to exploitation and they are likely to drop off the radar, making it even less likely that they can be returned. Continue reading “Red Cross report: Can’t Stay Can’t Go”